Quote of the day


You’ll never cross the ocean if you are afraid to lose sight of the shore

– make your mark on life

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NUTRIENT TIMING


When you eat is as important as what you eat when it comes to athletic performance. The tips below can guide you to the optimum times you need to eat and drink to perform your best, along with sample snacks and meals.

  Pre-Workout Fueling During Exercise (Hydration) Post-Workout Refueling Daily Fueling
Why To fuel up for the body’s next challenge To replace sweat loss and provide carbs to maintain blood sugar levels To replenish glycogen, restore electrolytes, replace fluid losses, and repair damaged tissues To support normal activities, repair damaged tissues, and promote muscle growth
What High-carbohydrate snack of 200–300 calories

Choose foods low in fat and fiber to prevent digestive upset

Water

Sports drinks*/** that contain sodium, potassium, glucose, and fructose

Weigh before and after working out; replace 16–24 oz fluid per pound lost throughout the day (not more than 12 quarts per day).

25–50 grams of carbs

20–25 grams of protein

Plenty of fluids

Choose easily digestible foods and beverages that provide electrolytes and fluids

Meals and snacks that emphasize a balanced diet of carbs, lean protein, healthy fats, and fluids—especially water

Choose lean protein (such as meat, poultry, fish, beans, nuts, or eggs), whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and low-fat dairy products

When 30–60 minutes prior During exercise up to one hour: 3–8 oz of water every 15–20 min

During exercise longer than one hour: 3–8 oz of a sports drink every 15–20 min

Within 45 minutes after a workout Throughout the remainder of the day
Suggestions
  • Jam*/jelly* on bread*
  • Fruit*, low-fat granola*, low-fat milk*
  • First Strike Bar*/**
  • Pudding cup* or low-fat Greek yogurt with fruit
  • Small muffin (muffin top*), low-fat milk*
 
  • Low-fat yogurt with fruit and granola, juice
  • Chocolate milk, fruit
  • Pita with hummus, tomatoes, cucumbers, tea
  • Tuna, crackers, fruit, water
  • Pocket sandwich**, sports drink**
  • Fruit and nut mix**, sports drink**
  • Chicken fajita with tortilla, beans, salsa*, water
  • Stir-fried tofu with veggies, rice, soymilk
Meals

  • Egg-white omelet with spinach and mushrooms, whole-grain bread, jam, low-fat milk*
  • Whole-wheat pita sandwich with turkey and veggies, pretzels, applesauce, low-fat milk*
  • Cheese tortellini in tomato sauce*, tossed salad, grapes, water
  • Lamb kebabs, pita, spinach, mango-yogurt beverage

Snacks

  • Yogurt or cottage cheese with fruit
  • Granola bar and milk
  • Trail mix
*In Meal Ready to Eat (MRE) **In First Strike Ration (FSR)

World famous cottage pie


One of my favourites here, so here goes

Ingredients

Some low calorie spray

  • 1¼kg beef mince
  • 2 onions , finely chopped
  • 3 carrots , chopped
  • 2 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp tomato purée
  • 4 tbsp Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 bay leaves

For the mash

  • 1.8kg potatoes, chopped
  • 225ml milk
  1. Heat 1 tbsp oil in a large saucepan and fry the mince until browned – you may need to do this in batches. Set aside as it browns. Put the rest of the oil into the pan, add the vegetables and cook on a gentle heat until soft, about 20 mins. Add the garlic, increase the heat and cook for a few mins, then return the beef to the pan and boil to reduce it slightly before adding the stock, Worcestershire sauce and herbs. Bring to a simmer and cook, uncovered, for 45 mins. By this time the gravy should be thick and coating the meat. Check after about 30 mins – if a lot of liquid remains, increase the heat slightly to reduce the gravy a little. Season well, then discard the bay leaves and thyme stalks.

  2. Meanwhile, make the mash. In a large saucepan, cover the potatoes in salted cold water, bring to the boil and simmer until tender. Drain well, then allow to steam-dry for a few mins. Mash well with the milk and then season with some salt and pepper.

  3. Spoon meat into 2 ovenproof dishes. Pipe or spoon on the mash to cover. If eating straight away, heat oven to 220C/200C fan/gas 7 and cook for 25-30 mins, or until the topping is golden

    Then enjoy, I know some people like to use some cheese fir topping but I was trying to watch the calories. Try it out and let me know what you think

The formal practice of mindfulness meditation


The theory of mindfulness without the practice is like a lecture on hydration without drinking water. It’s very dry, and it doesn’t really do us much good. So this next section is going to be very much around how to apply mindfulness. The application of mindfulness can be divided into a few different areas. Firstly, there’s the formal practice of mindfulness meditation. It’s like the gym work for attention, if you like. But there’s no point in being mindful for 5, or 10, or 20 minutes practicing meditation, and then being unmindful 23 hours and 40, or 50, or 55 minutes in the day.

 So the aim of mindfulness meditation is to have a better opportunity to be mindful when we get out of the chair and re-engage with our day-to-day life. So that’s the informal practice of mindfulness. Now, implicit it in both the formal and the informal practice of mindfulness are also a range of cognitive practices. And the big four, as far as I’m concerned, in mindfulness, have to do with the relationship between perception and stress, letting go, acceptance, and presence of mind.

cherie carter-scott’s rules of life (‘Rules for Being Human’)


Cherie Carter-Scott’s rules for life – also known as ‘The Ten Rules For Being Human’ – were referenced significantly, and initially anonymously, by Jack Canfield in ‘Chicken Soup For The Soul‘, until Canfield discovered the origins. As Canfield explains in his Foreward written for ‘If Life Is A Game, These Are The Rules‘, “…When we included the Rules for Being Human by ‘Anonymous‘ in Chicken Soup for the Soul®, I had no idea that Cherie was the author. When I learned that she was the author of the rules I was delighted and yet not surprised…”

 “Life is a succession of lessons which must be lived to be understood.” (Helen Keller)

Rule One – You will receive a body. Whether you love it or hate it, it’s yours for life, so accept it. What counts is what’s inside.

Rule Two – You will be presented with lessons. Life is a constant learning experience, which every day provides opportunities for you to learn more. These lessons specific to you, and learning them ‘is the key to discovering and fulfilling the meaning and relevance of your own life’.

Rule Three – There are no mistakes, only lessons. Your development towards wisdom is a process of experimentation, trial and error, so it’s inevitable things will not always go to plan or turn out how you’d want. Compassion is the remedy for harsh judgement – of ourselves and others. Forgiveness is not only divine – it’s also ‘the act of erasing an emotional debt’. Behaving ethically, with integrity, and with humour – especially the ability to laugh at yourself and your own mishaps – are central to the perspective that ‘mistakes’ are simply lessons we must learn.

Rule Four – The lesson is repeated until learned. Lessons repeat until learned. What manifest as problems and challenges, irritations and frustrations are more lessons – they will repeat until you see them as such and learn from them. Your own awareness and your ability to change are requisites of executing this rule. Also fundamental is the acceptance that you are not a victim of fate or circumstance – ‘causality’ must be acknowledged; that is to say: things happen to you because of how you are and what you do. To blame anyone or anything else for your misfortunes is an escape and a denial; you yourself are responsible for you, and what happens to you. Patience is required – change doesn’t happen overnight, so give change time to happen.

Rule Five – Learning does not end. While you are alive there are always lessons to be learned. Surrender to the ‘rhythm of life’, don’t struggle against it. Commit to the process of constant learning and change – be humble enough to always acknowledge your own weaknesses, and be flexible enough to adapt from what you may be accustomed to, because rigidity will deny you the freedom of new possibilities.

Rule Six – “There” is no better than “here”. The other side of the hill may be greener than your own, but being there is not the key to endless happiness. Be grateful for and enjoy what you have, and where you are on your journey. Appreciate the abundance of what’s good in your life, rather than measure and amass things that do not actually lead to happiness. Living in the present helps you attain peace.

Rule Seven – Others are only mirrors of you. You love or hate something about another person according to what love or hate about yourself. Be tolerant; accept others as they are, and strive for clarity of self-awareness; strive to truly understand and have an objective perception of your own self, your thoughts and feelings. Negative experiences are opportunities to heal the wounds that you carry. Support others, and by doing so you support yourself. Where you are unable to support others it is a sign that you are not adequately attending to your own needs.

Rule Eight – What you make of your life is up to you. You have all the tools and resources you need. What you do with them is up to you. Take responsibility for yourself. Learn to let go when you cannot change things. Don’t get angry about things – bitter memories clutter your mind. Courage resides in all of us – use it when you need to do what’s right for you. We all possess a strong natural power and adventurous spirit, which you should draw on to embrace what lies ahead.

Rule Nine – Your answers lie inside of you. Trust your instincts and your innermost feelings, whether you hear them as a little voice or a flash of inspiration. Listen to feelings as well as sounds. Look, listen, and trust. Draw on your natural inspiration.

Rule Ten – You will forget all this at birth. We are all born with all of these capabilities – our early experiences lead us into a physical world, away from our spiritual selves, so that we become doubtful, cynical and lacking belief and confidence. The ten Rules are not commandments, they are universal truths that apply to us all. When you lose your way, call upon them. Have faith in the strength of your spirit. Aspire to be wise – wisdom the ultimate path of your life, and it knows no limits other than those you impose on yourself.