Thought for the day


Life is so ironic, it takes sadness to know happiness, noise to appreciate silence and absence to value presence. Everything has a lesson for us to learn. So stay open and say #yes to it all and then let go!

-Make your mark

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Happy new year!


Making your mark on life is about having the drive, commitment and determination to see your goals through.

So make 2014 a year to be the best you can be. A year you can look back on with pride and that smug look on your face that says “I did that”.

Wishing everyone a happy and challenge filled new year.

Stay hungry

Be happy


“When I was 5 years old, my mother always told me that happiness was the key to life. When I went to school, they asked me what I wanted to be when I grew up. I wrote down ‘happy’. They told me I didn’t understand the assignment, and I told them they didn’t understand life.

John Lennon

Looking for a job


I’ve been busy the last few days looking for work. It’s tough out there at this present time.

The only thing to be is positive and tenacious. Also trying not to let your head drop.

Today this quote popped into my head and made me laugh

“The closest to perfection a person ever comes is when he fills out a job application form.”

Stanley J. Randall

Stay hungry!!

Burning Desire


There is a difference between wishing for a thing and being ready to receive it. No one is ready for a thing until he believes he can acquire it. The  state of mind must be belief, not mere hopes or wishes. open-mindedness is essential for belief. Closed minds do not inspire faith, courage or belief.

Remember no more effort is needed to aim high in life, to demand abundance and prosperity, than required to accept misery and poverty.

A great poem has correctly stated this universal truth through these lines

 

“I bargained with life for a penny,

And life would pay no more,

However I begged at evening,

When I counted my scanty store”

 

“For life is a just employer,

He gives you what you ask,

But once you have set the wages,

Why, You must bear the task.”

 

“I worked for a menial hire,

Only to learn, dismayed,

That any wage I had asked of life,

Life would have willingly paid”

 

Burning desire is what gets you through all the perspiration necessary to overcome the inevitable obstacles along the way.

read this article on setting clear goals.

 

How committed are you to achieving these goals? How much desire do you really have to seeing them through?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Saturday motivational “bold goals”


I think my man Greg Kolodziejzyk makes a great point in his article.

Take is away Greg

Ironman triathlon, drowning rats and BOLD goals.

I learned a valuable lesson at the Ironman world championships in Kona, Hawaii. That bit of wisdom is best summed up by a quote from Thomas Carlyle: “A man without a goal is like a ship without a rudder.”

Aside from simply finishing the race, I didn’t really have a goal. My challenge for the past four years has been to make it to Kona – to finish in the top 5 in my division at any Ironman qualifying race in North America and earn a slot to complete with the very best triathletes in the world. After seven Ironman races in four years, I had finally achieved that goal, and finished fourth at Ironman Arizona in April of 2006 with a time of 10 hours, 15 minutes. I was ecstatic – I had finally done it. I figured it out. I had qualified to compete head to head with the best athletes in the world at the Infamous Ironman world championships in Kona, Hawaii. Participating in the historic, exalted event in Hawaii was to be my reward.

But as Ralph Waldo Emerson said “The reward of a thing well done is to have done it.” My reward was received way back in April when I succeeded in accomplishing my goal – the race in Hawaii itself was no reward. It was just a really long, brutally hot and painful 12 hour slog through 140.6 miles of desolate lava fields.

Why? Because I had no goal in Hawaii aside from simply finishing. And from the moment the cannon went off to signal the swim start at 7:00 am on Saturday morning in Kailua-Kona Bay, all I could think about was the finish line. That’s no way to do an Ironman.

Dr. Richter of Johns Hopkins Medical School carried out an experiment that attempted to measure the motivational effect of having a goal. The experiments involved placing rats into cylinders of water that were thirty inches deep by eight inches wide. After a short time, half of the rats were momentarily rescued by being lifted out of the cylinder for a few seconds, then put right back into the water. The other half were not. The group that was given hope swam for more than three days. The other rats drowned almost immediately.

The rats that knew there was a chance of being rescued again had a goal – to stay alive until the next rescue. The other group had no goal, so they just gave up. I think that’s kind of what happened to me in Kona on Saturday – I didn’t really have a goal, so I sort of just checked out. That’s a very painful way to race an Ironman. It makes for one VERY long, VERY difficult day!

I learned about the necessity of a worthy goal. We are motivated by bold challenges that are only slightly out of reach. Winning Ironman Hawaii wasn’t even in the realm of possible outcomes, and placing somewhere in the middle of the pack was the best I could hope for. After all, I was racing with the best Ironman triathletes in the world. I figured that just making it to the finish line would provide me with enough incentive to enjoy the epic event, but evidently, I need more than that.

It was an important lesson learned and a day that I will never forget.