Sunday thought


Nothing ever goes away until it has taught us what we need to know
…nothing ever really attacks us except our own confusion. perhaps there is no solid obstacle except our own need to protect ourselves from being touched. maybe the only enemy is that we don’t like the way reality is now, and therefore wish it would go away fast. but what we find as practitioners is that nothing ever goes away until it has taught us what we need to know. If we run a hundred miles an hour to the other end of the continent in order to get away from the obstacle, we find the very same problem waiting for us when we arrive. It just keeps returning with new names, forms, manifestations until we learn whatever it has to teach us about where we are separating ourselves from reality, how we are pulling back instead of opening up, closing down instead of allowing ourselves to experience fully whatever we encounter, without hesitating or retreating into ourselves.

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Life’s toughest struggles are intended to make you better, not bitter. Your struggles with “losing” develop your greatest strengths. Many of the most vital lessons you learn in life you don’t necessarily seek on purpose. Sometimes the wrong choices bring you to the right places. In fact, every time you screw up, you’re one step closer to your goal. The only mistake that can truly hurt you is choosing to do nothing simply because you’re too scared to make a mistake.

Failure is not falling down; failure is staying down when you have the choice to get back up. Ultimately, what you need to remember is that you are in competition with one person and one person only – yourself. Your toughest competitor is simply the voices in your head. You can’t fail; you can only learn what you need to know to get up and take the next step.

Take the weekend to relax, recharge and get back on that proverbial horse.

Show the world what you can do.
Now, go make your Mark.

Imagine life without timekeeping


 

You probably can’t. You know the month, the year, the day of the week. There is a clock on your wall and on the dashboard of your car. You have a schedule, a calendar, a time for dinner or a movie.

Yet all around you timekeeping is ignored. Birds are not late. A dog does not check his watch. Deer do not fret over passing birthdays.

Man alone measures time. Man alone chimes the hour.

And because of this, man alone suffers a paralyzing fear that no other creature endures.

A fear of time running out

Are you in the right career?


Here’s an article that will interest you if you’re looking to make a change. It’s by Kathleen Gage,
a keynote speaker and business advisor.
Take it away Kathleen:
Ever wonder if you are in the right career? If you are like most people you have. Did you know that 80% of people are currently misemployed? They are either underemployed, not happy with their current position or not fairly compensated for their skill and/or function set. If so many people are misemployed, why do they stay in their current situation? Why do they not take the necessary steps to move into something that will be fulfilling and something they can look forward to doing every day – a situation they can truly be proud of?
The following are some of the most common reasons:

  • Complacency
  • Fear of the unknown
  • Fear of change
  • Not knowing what their options are
  • Don’t want to give up the familiar, no matter how uncomfortable the familiar is
  • Staying within their comfort zone
  • No time to search for something new
  • They just don’t know how to make a change
  • Fear of failure
  • Fear of success (they may actually get what they dreamed of)
  • They fear the job search is more frustrating than their current unsatisfactory job
  • Not knowing where to begin
    How often have we heard others give these reasons for not moving out of an unpleasant situation? How often have we said this to ourselves if we are actually misemployed? Imagine looking back over your life and saying, “I wish I would have done it differently.”
    So often in life, it is not what we do that we regret, rather what we don’t do that we regret the most. Things like not making a change when we knew a change was in order, or not taking the appropriate steps to move into a situation that would lend itself to a more fulfilling life both personally and professionally.
    If you or anyone you know are looking to make a career change, the following steps will help to make a smoother transition and find the courage to make that shift:
    1. Evaluate your current situation
  • 2. Decide you are ready to change
  • 3. Give yourself a timeframe for making the change
  • 4. Get excited about the change
  • 5. Become enlightened about your own values and realize you are worth a great situation
  • 6. Decide what kind of career would truly make you happy
  • 7. Determine what would bring you fulfillment
  • 8. Believe you deserve it
  • 9. Be willing to put time and effort into you transition
  • 10. Have a plan of action
  • 11. Take action on a daily basis
  • 12. Consult with people who have been successful in their own career shift
  • 13. Be willing to invest in yourself
  • 14. Work with a coach to keep you motivated
  • 15. Go after what you want
    Most of all – be willing to acknowledge that life is not a dress rehearsal, this is the real thing. When you look back over your life are you going to wish you had it to do all over and you had taken risks to move you into situation that would bring a deep level of satisfaction to you and your loved ones? The reality is that when we are in a career that brings us a deep sense of satisfaction, all those around us benefit from the fact that we are more fully present in life rather than constantly talking about wishing things would change. The truly successful people in life are the ones who are willing to create their happiness on a daily basis with the minute-by-minute actions they take and the thoughts they entertain.