Quote of the day

Wherever you go, no matter what the weather, always bring your own sunshine.

-Make your mark on life


Chicken,rice and pepper casserole

I wanted to make something I hadn’t made in a while and came up with this, chicken, rice and pepper casserole. Its easy, quick, comforting and near enough everyone will love it (well, you can’t please everyone).

Try it out and let me know what you think, any suggestions on improvement are welcome.

Nutrition value

PER SERVING: 418 Calories 48g Carbs 27g Protein 6g Fat


  • 1 tbsp organic coconut oil
  • 1kg of chicken legs
  • 1 large white onion, chopped
  • 1 large stick celery, finely chopped
  • 1 red pepper, diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 tbsp tomato purée
  • 1 tbsp dried thyme 11/4 pts fresh chicken stock (or use one organic stock cube)
  • 150g long grain rice (dry weight)
  • 150g cauliflower, finely chopped
  • salt and pepper


Melt the oil over a medium/ high heat in a large saucepan.

Brown the chicken pieces on all sides. You may have to do this in batches. Remove from the dish and put to one side.

Lower the heat, add the onion, celery and pepper and gently cook for 10 minutes until softened.

Add the garlic and cook for a further 2 minutes.

Stir in the tomato purée and cook for 1 minute.

Return the chicken pieces to the dish along with the thyme and stock. Bring the liquid to a boil, cover and reduce the heat to medium / low. Cook for 30 minutes.

Add the rice and stir well. Cover, set over a low heat and cook for a further 15 minutes or until the rice is cooked and has absorbed most of the liquid.

Add the cauliflower and cook for a further 5 minutes.

Remove from the heat and leave the dish to sit for 10 minutes to absorb any of the remaining liquid.

Season to taste.

5 stages of change


The 5 Stages of Change Model is a very useful framework that describes the series of stages we go through to change our lifestyle habits. The critical assumption that underpins this model is that behavioral changes do not happen in one step, but through a series of distinct, predicable stages. Just realizing the stage of change you’re in may be helpful for you to succeed.

While this model was originally developed in the 1970’s to better understand how smokers are able to give up their addiction to cigarettes, it has since been used to understand changing just about any type of behavior. For the purposes of this article, eating unhealthy foods, or not exercising are the habits we are trying to change.

1) Precontemplation

People in this stage haven’t even thought about making any change to their habits and don’t recognize that they have a problem. They may be pessimistic about their ability to make change, or even deny the negative effects of their existing lifestyle habits. They pick and choose information that helps confirm their decision not to exercise, or eat better.

It’s difficult to reach, or help people in the precontemplation stage, because as they see it, there is no problem. It may take an emotional trigger, or event of some kind that can snap people out of their denial. It’s highly likely if you are taking the time to read this article, you are not in this stage.

2) Contemplation

During this stage, you are weighing the pros and cons, effort, time, finances etc. and benefits of lifestyle modification. You are contemplating whether it’s something that will be worth it. People can remain in this stage for years without preparing to take the next step forward.

I think setting very powerful, motivating goals and visualising your results can be very helpful for someone in the contemplative stage. If you can identify new ways that making a change will benefit you, the benefits will begin to outweigh the costs. We tend to seek pleasure and avoid pain, so the more pleasure you can envision the more likely you will move on.

3) Preparation

People in the preparation stage have decided to change their negative habits. Congratulations if you’re in this category! You may have just set up an appointment with a personal trainer, nutritionist, or other fitness professional, purchased a fitness program, or started a gym membership.

4) Action

The action stage is the process of changing your lifestyle, whether you are exercising more consistently, or eating healthier. Individuals in this stage are at the greatest risk of relapse, so it’s key to leverage any techniques you can to stay motivated.

5) Maintenance

This is the stage of successful, sustained lifestyle modification. If you have been exercising for years consistently and have developed positive habits into your lifestyle, then you are in the maintenance stage.

A lot of people tend to bounce between the contemplation, preparation and action stages, most people are “yoyo” dieters and exercisers. I think one way to prevent this yoyo effect from happening is to make small changes in your habits that over time create something meaningful.

In addition, yoyo dieters and exercisers should understand that maintaining physical fitness and changing fitness are two totally different paths that require different approaches. It’s not that difficult to maintain a given level of physical fitness just by remaining consistent (unless you are at a very high level). It’s very difficult, however, to prepare and take action to change your body. Our bodies are resistant to change, so trying to change them takes a MASSIVE effort that requires a substantial commitment, both mental and physical. Once you’ve changed your body, you can coast without losing that fitness level. It’s a lot better to cut back on exercise and maintain what you’ve gained then to stop completely. Quitters never win.

I hope these 5 stages of change are a helpful framework for you to reference when you are looking to make some type of change in your life.

Also remember that if you ‘fall off the wagon’ you don’t have to go back to the very beginning. For example if you stall at the action stage go back to the preparation, not as far back as contemplation. There will always be stumbling blocks, mental, physical, environmental etc.. the thing to remember is they stumbling blocks not a stop sign.

So, that concludes my article, but if you have any questions please put them in the comments box and together we can all be the best version of ourselves.

Stay hungry.

Roasted veggie pasta

This roasted veggie pasta recipe is great, just some average ingredients but combined they make a fantastic, tasty, healthy meal that will have you asking for seconds.

Try it out and post your thoughts.


  • 200g wholemeal pasta
  • 1 large red onion, sliced
  • 2 medium carrots, sliced and diced
  • 10 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Handful of kale
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • Salt and black pepper


1. Cook the pasta according to the package directions. Drain and pour back into the pot. Break the egg into the hot pasta and stir around.

2. Preheat oven to 200c.

3. In a large oven proof bowl, throw in red onion, carrots, tomatoes and salt. Mix everything together and place in the oven.

4. Roast for 20 minutes, then take them out, add the kale, garlic, and lemon juice, stir, and throw them back in the oven until some of the veggies start looking a little browned around the edges, 10 to 15 minutes longer.

5. Add the roasted veggies to the cooked pasta, pour in the balsamic, a pinch of salt and black pepper, and stir. Taste and add more garlic, vinegar, lemon juice to whatever your taste buds desire.

The Mighty Meatzza

If you like meat and you like pizza well this is the dish for you. Its guilt free and is so versatile, hot or cold, breakfast or lunch the possibilities are endless. Well, maybe not endless but pretty good. Its quick, easy and not too expensive too.

Check this out and let me know what you think

Image result for meatzza


  • 4 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 500g passata with basil
  • 25g finely chopped fresh basil, plus leaves to garnish
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 100g low fat natural cottage cheese
  • 200g chestnut mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 red pepper, deseeded and thinly sliced
  • 1 yellow pepper, deseeded and thinly sliced
for the base:
  • 500g lean beef mince (5% fat or less)
  • 250g lean pork mince (5% fat or less)
  • 2 tsp dried Italian herb mix (OR ANY SPICES YOU DECIDE)
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce


  1. Preheat the oven to 190°c/Fan 170°c/Gas 5. Put the garlic, onion, passata in a saucepan and bring to the boil over a high heat. Turn the heat down to medium, stir in the basil, season to taste and simmer for 20-25 minutes or until thickened, stirring occasionally. Remove from the heat and set aside.
  2. Meanwhile, line a heavy-based 25cm pizza tin with non-stick baking parchment. Put all the ingredients for the base into a large bowl, season to taste and mix well using your fingers. Press this mixture into the prepared tin to make a flat round base and bake for 12-15 minutes. Remove the base from the oven and drain off any liquid. Increase the oven temperature to 220°c/Fan 200°c/Gas 7.
  3. Spread the passata mixture over the base, scatter over the mushrooms and peppers. Return the pizza to the oven and cook for 8-10 minutes or until the topping is lightly browned and bubbling. Scatter over the basil leaves, cut into wedges and serve with a crisp green salad.


Superfood Salad

Today we are in a healthy mood so this “superfood salad” is on the menu. Its quick and easy to make but its bursting with flavour and very filling. Did I mention very healthy? Try it out let me know your opinions.

Image result for superfood salad

  • serves: 4
  •  cooking: 15 min


  • 1 cup quinoa
  • approx. 100 g / 3.5 oz green salad (I used baby spinach leaves and kale)
  • small wedge of red cabbage, shredded thinly
  • 300g Beetroot
  • small broccoli, divided into florets
  • ½ cup frozen peas (or fresh if available)
  • small cucumber, sliced
  • ½ cup mung bean sprouts (or other sprouts)
  • 1 zucchini / courgette
  • 1 large spring onion, sliced thinly
  • a handful of mint and basil leaves, (chopped if you like)


  1. Rinse quinoa and place it in a small pot that you have a glass lid for. Add a few pinches of salt and 1.5 cups of water (prefect quinoa ratio is 1:1.5), cover with a lid and bring to boil. Once the water boils, decrease the heat to low-medium and let the quinoa simmer until all the water has been absorbed. To check, tilt the pot slightly, keeping the lid firmly on. If you see no water seeping out from under the grain, it means you are good to go. Switch off the heat completely and let quinoa sit on a hot hob (with lid firmly on) for another 5 mins to finish off cooking in its own steam. Once ready, cool it down completely before adding it to the salad as otherwise the salad leaves will wilt.
  2. Bring a pot of water to boil. Prepare a bowl of cold water with a few ice cubes and set it next to the stove. Once the water boils, add broccoli florets and frozen peas and cook for about 90 seconds. Once the time is up, drain the vegetables and immediately plunge them into the cold water so that they retain their beautiful colour. Place on a sieve to drain well. Lightly season with salt and pepper before adding to the salad.
  3. Prepare courgettes by either turning it into zoodles (use a spiralizer if you have one) or slicing it and grilling it on a grill pan. If grilling, brush each slice with a bit of olive oil, season with salt and pepper and arrange on a hot (that’s important) grill / griddle pan. Once the slices are browned on one side, turn them over and let them brown on the other side.
  4. Mix all the dressing ingredients together and set aside.
  5. Just before serving, combine all the salad ingredients in a large bowl. Drizzle the dressing over and scatter spring onions, sprouts and herbs on top.