Bulking Up, where to start


There are a lot of articles and advice out there about losing weight and cutting down but what if you have the opposite intentions, bulking up is in my opinion just as difficult if not more.

I have put a few tips below to help out, let me know what you think

1. Eat more

If you want to gain more muscle then you need to up your calorie intake, which means eating more. If you aren’t consuming more calories than you are burning throughout the day, you won’t be able to put on any muscle. Your diet should be made up of nutritious, unprocessed foods that are rich in complex carbs, protein, healthy unsaturated fats, and important nutrients needed for muscle growth, energy production and good health. Steer away from processed, sugary and fatty foods that will only mess with your blood sugar levels and promote fat gain.

2. Increase your protein intake

Protein is essential for providing your body with amino acids, which are vital for building and repairing muscles. Have some good quality protein with each meal and with snacks. Having protein with each meal and with snacks will help increase amino acid levels to optimize muscle growth. Choose healthy, lean protein choices such as lean meat, chicken, eggs, fish, legumes and low-fat dairy foods. Healthy protein-rich snacks include nuts and seeds, quinoa, yoghurt, muesli and protein bars and balls, and hummus with wholegrain crackers.

3. Protein powders are a great way to boost your protein intake

There are lots of different protein powders the market. If you find whey-based protein powders difficult to digest, and you suffer from bloating and gas when you consume them, go for a brown-rice-based protein powder instead, that is still a fantastic protein source without the tummy upset. You don’t need to go overboard with protein either as excessive amounts of protein can put you at risk of putting on fat.

4. Don’t forget to have some complex carbs with each meal

You need carbohydrates for energy, and to fuel your muscles when you train to stimulate muscle growth. Choose complex carbohydrates such as whole grains, brown rice, wholemeal pasta, whole oats, grainy breads and root vegies like sweet potato. These types of carbs will supply you with sustained energy.

5. Eat 5-6 smaller meals

Eating 5-6 smaller means throughout the day ensures that your body is getting a good constant supply of fuel and amino acids to build and repair muscles. Having a protein shake (that also contains some carbohydrates) around 30 to 60 minutes after weight training will help encourage muscle development by upping the production of anabolic hormones. Protein fruit smoothies are another healthy post-workout snack, made with healthy ingredients like low-fat milk, banana, berries, chia seeds, yogurt and protein powder.

With all the above I would also recommend a resistance training program to get those muscles moving.

Strength training can be done at home or in the gym. Common choices include:

  • Body weight. You can do many exercises with little or no equipment. Try pushups, pullups, abdominal crunches and leg squats.
  • Resistance tubing. Resistance tubing is inexpensive, lightweight tubing that provides resistance when stretched. You can choose from many types of resistance tubes in nearly any sporting goods store.
  • Free weights. Barbells and dumbbells are classic strength training tools.
  • Weight machines. Most fitness centers offer various resistance machines. You can also invest in weight machines for use at home.
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Which supplement may help with cold and flu?


I was thinking the other day if there were any supplements worth looking at and trying out during this winter season. The following excerpt was taken from Kamal over at http://www.examine.com which I thought was an interesting read and worth sharing, let me know if you have tried any of these.

Here goes

 

Colds suck, and the flu is worse. So the million-dollar question is: are there supplements that actually work to ward off an infection or lessen its symptoms?

Echinacea

Taken daily, echinacea might reduce the risk and duration of upper respiratory infections:[1] examining the trials reveals a positive but statistically insignificant trend.[2]

Echinacea has the potential to interact with medications, particularly immunosuppressive drugs. Consult with your doctor before you consider trying this supplement.

Echinacea might reduce the risk and duration of upper respiratory infections, but the studies don’t all agree.

Elderberry

Elderberry is known for its antioxidant properties, and in one randomized trial, an elderberry extract reduced the duration and severity of colds more than did placebo.[3] A few human trials have also shown elderberry to reduce the symptoms of the flu,[4] but here the evidence is weakened by small sample sizes and, in some cases, low methodological quality.

Due to the small number of studies, both the efficacy and safety of elderberry are still in doubt.[5]Should you choose to prepare elderberry juice yourself, rather than to purchase a supplement, remember that the berries must be properly cooked, since they can otherwise cause nausea or, worse, cyanide toxicity. Only ever use the berries — the rest of the plant is poisonous and should not be consumed in any form.

Elderberry is a promising but understudied supplement: it may reduce the symptoms of the cold and flu, but the evidence is still preliminary. Beware: the plant is poisonous, and even the berries can be dangerous if not prepared properly.

Glutamine

We know that the human body needs more glutamine when it gets sick, and we suspect that decreased concentrations of glutamine brought about by long exercise periods can suppress immunological functions.[6] What we don’t know is if glutamine supplementation can help fight off either the flu or the common cold.

Glutamine can support immune functions in periods of critical illness, but its effects on the common cold are not well understood. Preliminary evidence suggests that supplementation is more likely to benefit people who participate in prolonged cardiovascular exercise, such as ultra-marathons.

Pelargonium Sidoides

Pelargonium sidoides contains prodelphinidins — tannins that can help prevent bacteria from attaching to the lining of the throat and lungs. Pelargonium sidoides doesn’t seem to ward off colds, but it may be able to reduce their duration and severity.[7][8]

Pelargonium sidoides seems to reduce the duration and severity of colds, but the evidence is still preliminary.

Probiotics

Various probiotics have been shown to interact with immune system cells,[9] yet the evidence for their use in cold prevention is mixed.[10]

Certain probiotics might help prevent upper respiratory infections in athletes,[11] children,[12] and the elderly,[13] but much of the evidence is of low or very low quality. Higher-quality trials are needed to determine if taking probiotics can really help fight infections — and if yes, which strains should be taken.

Probiotics might help prevent infections of the upper respiratory tract, but the evidence is still too weak to recommend their use.

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Vitamin C

Vitamin C is marketed as the go-to supplement for preventing and treating colds.

Mechanistically, it makes sense: vitamin C helps immune cells form and function properly, and also supports our physical barriers against pathogens.[14] Moreover, at least 148 studies have found that vitamin C administration helps prevent infections caused by microorganisms.[15]

Yet, the question remains: does supplementation in humans help ward off colds? A recent meta-analysis tried to answer this question,[16] and here are the takeaways:

  • People who start taking vitamin C when they already have a cold don’t see any benefit. Some studies suggest that very high doses (several grams) might reduce the duration of colds, but more studies are needed for confirmation.
  • People who take vitamin C regularly can expect shorter colds (by 8% in adults and 14% in children) with slightly less severe symptoms.
  • Athletes who take vitamin C regularly are half as likely to catch a cold as athletes who don’t. Only people who “perform regular or acute bouts of intense exercise” seem to enjoy this benefit.

    Vitamin C can reduce the duration of colds (and even help ward them off, if you’re an athlete), but only if you’ve been supplementing regularly. If you start when you’re sick, it’s too late.

Vitamin D

Vitamin D receptors are found throughout the body, and vitamin D is involved in many cellular processes, so it should come as no surprise that a deficiency can impair immunity.

Epidemiological studies show an association between low vitamin D levels and a higher risk of viral infections of the upper respiratory tract (URT). According to a 2017 systematic review of randomized trials and meta-analyses, taking vitamin D could help prevent asthma symptoms as well as URT infections.[17] In a randomized trial whose results were published the same year, the incidence and duration of URT viral infections were the same for children taking 400 IU/day and for children taking 2000 IU/day.[18]

Vitamin D serves many functions in the body, and a deficiency seems to impair immunity. Large systematic reviews have found that supplementation can help prevent upper respiratory infections.

Zinc

Zinc plays many roles in the body — including several in the immune system alone. If you easily catch colds, make sure your diet provides you with enough zinc. Athletes and other people who sweat a lot are at greater risk of zinc insufficiency, but taking too much zinc is aso a risk, so be careful.

Zinc lozenges can reduce the duration of the common cold when taken within 24 hours of symptom onset.[19] They can limit virus replication at the nasal epithelium and may reduce respiratory tract inflammation. Lozenges with zinc acetate may be more effective than lozenges with zinc gluconate (a more common form), but the trials are few, and a recent meta-analysis doesn’t show a clear difference.[20]

Zinc lozenges can cause nausea and dysgeusia (a change in taste perception), but those symptoms stop when supplementation stops.[19] In addition to nausea and dysgeusia, zinc nasal sprays can cause anosmia,[21] and this loss of smell perception may persist after supplementation has stopped. For that reason, and because the sprays have not been shown to be more effective than the lozenges, the sprays are not recommended.

Taking zinc lozenges throughout the day, starting from the very first symptoms of a cold, may reduce the duration of the illness, but supplementation should not exceed 100 mg of zinc per day for a week. Since zinc nasal sprays might cause a lingering loss in smell perception, they’re better avoided.

Recommendations

Reaching for a supplement or two can seem like a quick and simple way to defend yourself against the cold and flu. Be it for prevention or treatment, however, even taking the best supplements won’t help as much as …

  • Eating a healthy, nutrient-dense diet,
  • Sleeping enough and managing stress,
  • Staying away from sick people as much as possible, and
  • Washing your hands, especially before touching your face.

So, as always, choose efficacious supplements to complement your healthy habits — not to make up for a lifestyle that predisposes you to getting sick.

 

 

References

  1. Shah SA, et al. Evaluation of echinacea for the prevention and treatment of the common cold: a meta-analysis . Lancet Infect Dis. (2007)
  2. Karsch-Völk M, et al. Echinacea for preventing and treating the common cold . Cochrane Database Syst Rev. (2014)
  3. Tiralongo E, Wee SS, Lea RA. Elderberry Supplementation Reduces Cold Duration and Symptoms in Air-Travellers: A Randomized, Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial . Nutrients. (2016)
  4. Ulbricht C, et al. An evidence-based systematic review of elderberry and elderflower (Sambucus nigra) by the Natural Standard Research Collaboration . J Diet Suppl. (2014)
  5. Holst L, Havnen GC, Nordeng H. Echinacea and elderberry-should they be used against upper respiratory tract infections during pregnancy? . Front Pharmacol. (2014)
  6. Parry-Billings M, et al. Plasma amino acid concentrations in the overtraining syndrome: possible effects on the immune system . Med Sci Sports Exerc. (1992)
  7. Fashner J, Ericson K, Werner S. Treatment of the common cold in children and adults . Am Fam Physician. (2012)
  8. Lizogub VG, Riley DS, Heger M. Efficacy of a pelargonium sidoides preparation in patients with the common cold: a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial . Explore (NY). (2007)
  9. Meng H, et al. Consumption of Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis BB-12 impacts upper respiratory tract infection and the function of NK and T cells in healthy adults . Mol Nutr Food Res. (2016)
  10. Braga VL, et al. What do Cochrane systematic reviews say about probiotics as preventive interventions? . Sao Paulo Med J. (2017)
  11. Strasser B, et al. Probiotic Supplements Beneficially Affect Tryptophan-Kynurenine Metabolism and Reduce the Incidence of Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Trained Athletes: A Randomized, Double-Blinded, Placebo-Controlled Trial . Nutrients. (2016)
  12. Wang Y, et al. Probiotics for prevention and treatment of respiratory tract infections in children: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials . Medicine (Baltimore). (2016)
  13. Pu F, et al. Yogurt supplemented with probiotics can protect the healthy elderly from respiratory infections: A randomized controlled open-label trial . Clin Interv Aging. (2017)
  14. Carr AC, Maggini S. Vitamin C and Immune Function . Nutrients. (2017)
  15. Hemilä H. Vitamin C and Infections . Nutrients. (2017)
  16. Hemilä H, Chalker E. Vitamin C for preventing and treating the common cold . Cochrane Database Syst Rev. (2013)
  17. Autier P, et al. Effect of vitamin D supplementation on non-skeletal disorders: a systematic review of meta-analyses and randomised trials . Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol. (2017)
  18. Aglipay M, et al. Effect of High-Dose vs Standard-Dose Wintertime Vitamin D Supplementation on Viral Upper Respiratory Tract Infections in Young Healthy ChildrenJAMA. (2017)
  19. Singh M, Das RR. Zinc for the common cold . Cochrane Database Syst Rev. (2013)
  20. Hemilä H. Zinc lozenges and the common cold: a meta-analysis comparing zinc acetate and zinc gluconate, and the role of zinc dosage . JRSM Open. (2017)
  21. Alexander TH, Davidson TM. Intranasal zinc and anosmia: the zinc-induced anosmia syndrome . Laryngoscope. (2006)

 

 

Chicken,rice and pepper casserole


I wanted to make something I hadn’t made in a while and came up with this, chicken, rice and pepper casserole. Its easy, quick, comforting and near enough everyone will love it (well, you can’t please everyone).

Try it out and let me know what you think, any suggestions on improvement are welcome.

Nutrition value

PER SERVING: 418 Calories 48g Carbs 27g Protein 6g Fat

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp organic coconut oil
  • 1kg of chicken legs
  • 1 large white onion, chopped
  • 1 large stick celery, finely chopped
  • 1 red pepper, diced
  • 3 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 tbsp tomato purée
  • 1 tbsp dried thyme 11/4 pts fresh chicken stock (or use one organic stock cube)
  • 150g long grain rice (dry weight)
  • 150g cauliflower, finely chopped
  • salt and pepper

Method

Melt the oil over a medium/ high heat in a large saucepan.

Brown the chicken pieces on all sides. You may have to do this in batches. Remove from the dish and put to one side.

Lower the heat, add the onion, celery and pepper and gently cook for 10 minutes until softened.

Add the garlic and cook for a further 2 minutes.

Stir in the tomato purée and cook for 1 minute.

Return the chicken pieces to the dish along with the thyme and stock. Bring the liquid to a boil, cover and reduce the heat to medium / low. Cook for 30 minutes.

Add the rice and stir well. Cover, set over a low heat and cook for a further 15 minutes or until the rice is cooked and has absorbed most of the liquid.

Add the cauliflower and cook for a further 5 minutes.

Remove from the heat and leave the dish to sit for 10 minutes to absorb any of the remaining liquid.

Season to taste.

5 stages of change


                                        stagesofchangegraphic

The 5 Stages of Change Model is a very useful framework that describes the series of stages we go through to change our lifestyle habits. The critical assumption that underpins this model is that behavioral changes do not happen in one step, but through a series of distinct, predicable stages. Just realizing the stage of change you’re in may be helpful for you to succeed.

While this model was originally developed in the 1970’s to better understand how smokers are able to give up their addiction to cigarettes, it has since been used to understand changing just about any type of behavior. For the purposes of this article, eating unhealthy foods, or not exercising are the habits we are trying to change.

1) Precontemplation

People in this stage haven’t even thought about making any change to their habits and don’t recognize that they have a problem. They may be pessimistic about their ability to make change, or even deny the negative effects of their existing lifestyle habits. They pick and choose information that helps confirm their decision not to exercise, or eat better.

It’s difficult to reach, or help people in the precontemplation stage, because as they see it, there is no problem. It may take an emotional trigger, or event of some kind that can snap people out of their denial. It’s highly likely if you are taking the time to read this article, you are not in this stage.

2) Contemplation

During this stage, you are weighing the pros and cons, effort, time, finances etc. and benefits of lifestyle modification. You are contemplating whether it’s something that will be worth it. People can remain in this stage for years without preparing to take the next step forward.

I think setting very powerful, motivating goals and visualising your results can be very helpful for someone in the contemplative stage. If you can identify new ways that making a change will benefit you, the benefits will begin to outweigh the costs. We tend to seek pleasure and avoid pain, so the more pleasure you can envision the more likely you will move on.

3) Preparation

People in the preparation stage have decided to change their negative habits. Congratulations if you’re in this category! You may have just set up an appointment with a personal trainer, nutritionist, or other fitness professional, purchased a fitness program, or started a gym membership.

4) Action

The action stage is the process of changing your lifestyle, whether you are exercising more consistently, or eating healthier. Individuals in this stage are at the greatest risk of relapse, so it’s key to leverage any techniques you can to stay motivated.

5) Maintenance

This is the stage of successful, sustained lifestyle modification. If you have been exercising for years consistently and have developed positive habits into your lifestyle, then you are in the maintenance stage.

A lot of people tend to bounce between the contemplation, preparation and action stages, most people are “yoyo” dieters and exercisers. I think one way to prevent this yoyo effect from happening is to make small changes in your habits that over time create something meaningful.

In addition, yoyo dieters and exercisers should understand that maintaining physical fitness and changing fitness are two totally different paths that require different approaches. It’s not that difficult to maintain a given level of physical fitness just by remaining consistent (unless you are at a very high level). It’s very difficult, however, to prepare and take action to change your body. Our bodies are resistant to change, so trying to change them takes a MASSIVE effort that requires a substantial commitment, both mental and physical. Once you’ve changed your body, you can coast without losing that fitness level. It’s a lot better to cut back on exercise and maintain what you’ve gained then to stop completely. Quitters never win.

I hope these 5 stages of change are a helpful framework for you to reference when you are looking to make some type of change in your life.

Also remember that if you ‘fall off the wagon’ you don’t have to go back to the very beginning. For example if you stall at the action stage go back to the preparation, not as far back as contemplation. There will always be stumbling blocks, mental, physical, environmental etc.. the thing to remember is they stumbling blocks not a stop sign.

So, that concludes my article, but if you have any questions please put them in the comments box and together we can all be the best version of ourselves.

Stay hungry.

Roasted veggie pasta


This roasted veggie pasta recipe is great, just some average ingredients but combined they make a fantastic, tasty, healthy meal that will have you asking for seconds.

Try it out and post your thoughts.

INGREDIENTS:

  • 200g wholemeal pasta
  • 1 large red onion, sliced
  • 2 medium carrots, sliced and diced
  • 10 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 1 egg
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • Handful of kale
  • 3 cloves garlic, crushed
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • Salt and black pepper

 

1. Cook the pasta according to the package directions. Drain and pour back into the pot. Break the egg into the hot pasta and stir around.

2. Preheat oven to 200c.

3. In a large oven proof bowl, throw in red onion, carrots, tomatoes and salt. Mix everything together and place in the oven.

4. Roast for 20 minutes, then take them out, add the kale, garlic, and lemon juice, stir, and throw them back in the oven until some of the veggies start looking a little browned around the edges, 10 to 15 minutes longer.

5. Add the roasted veggies to the cooked pasta, pour in the balsamic, a pinch of salt and black pepper, and stir. Taste and add more garlic, vinegar, lemon juice to whatever your taste buds desire.

The Mighty Meatzza


If you like meat and you like pizza well this is the dish for you. Its guilt free and is so versatile, hot or cold, breakfast or lunch the possibilities are endless. Well, maybe not endless but pretty good. Its quick, easy and not too expensive too.

Check this out and let me know what you think

Image result for meatzza

Ingredients

  • 4 garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 onion, finely chopped
  • 500g passata with basil
  • 25g finely chopped fresh basil, plus leaves to garnish
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper
  • 100g low fat natural cottage cheese
  • 200g chestnut mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 red pepper, deseeded and thinly sliced
  • 1 yellow pepper, deseeded and thinly sliced
for the base:
  • 500g lean beef mince (5% fat or less)
  • 250g lean pork mince (5% fat or less)
  • 2 tsp dried Italian herb mix (OR ANY SPICES YOU DECIDE)
  • 1 egg, lightly beaten
  • 1 tsp Worcestershire sauce

Method

  1. Preheat the oven to 190°c/Fan 170°c/Gas 5. Put the garlic, onion, passata in a saucepan and bring to the boil over a high heat. Turn the heat down to medium, stir in the basil, season to taste and simmer for 20-25 minutes or until thickened, stirring occasionally. Remove from the heat and set aside.
  2. Meanwhile, line a heavy-based 25cm pizza tin with non-stick baking parchment. Put all the ingredients for the base into a large bowl, season to taste and mix well using your fingers. Press this mixture into the prepared tin to make a flat round base and bake for 12-15 minutes. Remove the base from the oven and drain off any liquid. Increase the oven temperature to 220°c/Fan 200°c/Gas 7.
  3. Spread the passata mixture over the base, scatter over the mushrooms and peppers. Return the pizza to the oven and cook for 8-10 minutes or until the topping is lightly browned and bubbling. Scatter over the basil leaves, cut into wedges and serve with a crisp green salad.

 

Superfood Salad


Today we are in a healthy mood so this “superfood salad” is on the menu. Its quick and easy to make but its bursting with flavour and very filling. Did I mention very healthy? Try it out let me know your opinions.

Image result for superfood salad

  • serves: 4
  •  cooking: 15 min

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 cup quinoa
  • approx. 100 g / 3.5 oz green salad (I used baby spinach leaves and kale)
  • small wedge of red cabbage, shredded thinly
  • 300g Beetroot
  • small broccoli, divided into florets
  • ½ cup frozen peas (or fresh if available)
  • small cucumber, sliced
  • ½ cup mung bean sprouts (or other sprouts)
  • 1 zucchini / courgette
  • 1 large spring onion, sliced thinly
  • a handful of mint and basil leaves, (chopped if you like)

METHOD

  1. Rinse quinoa and place it in a small pot that you have a glass lid for. Add a few pinches of salt and 1.5 cups of water (prefect quinoa ratio is 1:1.5), cover with a lid and bring to boil. Once the water boils, decrease the heat to low-medium and let the quinoa simmer until all the water has been absorbed. To check, tilt the pot slightly, keeping the lid firmly on. If you see no water seeping out from under the grain, it means you are good to go. Switch off the heat completely and let quinoa sit on a hot hob (with lid firmly on) for another 5 mins to finish off cooking in its own steam. Once ready, cool it down completely before adding it to the salad as otherwise the salad leaves will wilt.
  2. Bring a pot of water to boil. Prepare a bowl of cold water with a few ice cubes and set it next to the stove. Once the water boils, add broccoli florets and frozen peas and cook for about 90 seconds. Once the time is up, drain the vegetables and immediately plunge them into the cold water so that they retain their beautiful colour. Place on a sieve to drain well. Lightly season with salt and pepper before adding to the salad.
  3. Prepare courgettes by either turning it into zoodles (use a spiralizer if you have one) or slicing it and grilling it on a grill pan. If grilling, brush each slice with a bit of olive oil, season with salt and pepper and arrange on a hot (that’s important) grill / griddle pan. Once the slices are browned on one side, turn them over and let them brown on the other side.
  4. Mix all the dressing ingredients together and set aside.
  5. Just before serving, combine all the salad ingredients in a large bowl. Drizzle the dressing over and scatter spring onions, sprouts and herbs on top.

 

NUTRIENT TIMING


When you eat is as important as what you eat when it comes to athletic performance. The tips below can guide you to the optimum times you need to eat and drink to perform your best, along with sample snacks and meals.

  Pre-Workout Fueling During Exercise (Hydration) Post-Workout Refueling Daily Fueling
Why To fuel up for the body’s next challenge To replace sweat loss and provide carbs to maintain blood sugar levels To replenish glycogen, restore electrolytes, replace fluid losses, and repair damaged tissues To support normal activities, repair damaged tissues, and promote muscle growth
What High-carbohydrate snack of 200–300 calories

Choose foods low in fat and fiber to prevent digestive upset

Water

Sports drinks*/** that contain sodium, potassium, glucose, and fructose

Weigh before and after working out; replace 16–24 oz fluid per pound lost throughout the day (not more than 12 quarts per day).

25–50 grams of carbs

20–25 grams of protein

Plenty of fluids

Choose easily digestible foods and beverages that provide electrolytes and fluids

Meals and snacks that emphasize a balanced diet of carbs, lean protein, healthy fats, and fluids—especially water

Choose lean protein (such as meat, poultry, fish, beans, nuts, or eggs), whole grains, fruits and vegetables, and low-fat dairy products

When 30–60 minutes prior During exercise up to one hour: 3–8 oz of water every 15–20 min

During exercise longer than one hour: 3–8 oz of a sports drink every 15–20 min

Within 45 minutes after a workout Throughout the remainder of the day
Suggestions
  • Jam*/jelly* on bread*
  • Fruit*, low-fat granola*, low-fat milk*
  • First Strike Bar*/**
  • Pudding cup* or low-fat Greek yogurt with fruit
  • Small muffin (muffin top*), low-fat milk*
 
  • Low-fat yogurt with fruit and granola, juice
  • Chocolate milk, fruit
  • Pita with hummus, tomatoes, cucumbers, tea
  • Tuna, crackers, fruit, water
  • Pocket sandwich**, sports drink**
  • Fruit and nut mix**, sports drink**
  • Chicken fajita with tortilla, beans, salsa*, water
  • Stir-fried tofu with veggies, rice, soymilk
Meals

  • Egg-white omelet with spinach and mushrooms, whole-grain bread, jam, low-fat milk*
  • Whole-wheat pita sandwich with turkey and veggies, pretzels, applesauce, low-fat milk*
  • Cheese tortellini in tomato sauce*, tossed salad, grapes, water
  • Lamb kebabs, pita, spinach, mango-yogurt beverage

Snacks

  • Yogurt or cottage cheese with fruit
  • Granola bar and milk
  • Trail mix
*In Meal Ready to Eat (MRE) **In First Strike Ration (FSR)

Mediterranean chicken paella


I raided the cupboards and found the ingredients below and racked my brain thinking what to make, I finally came up with paella.

Have a look and feel free to share your opinions

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp olice

    oil

  • 3 chicken breasts fillets, cut into chunks
  • 2 small onions

    finely sliced

  • 1 fat garlic clove, crushed
  • 1 tsp turmeric
  • pinch of saffron
  • 1 tsp paprika
  • 300g basmati rice
  • 850ml hot chicken stock
  • 1 tin garden peas
  • 1 leek
  • 1 pepper (choice of colour is yours)

Method

Get your chicken and place on an oven proof dish, put in the oven at about 200 C for around 25 mins.

Pour your rice into a saucepan cover with water and bring to the boil.

  1. Heat the oil in a deep frying pan, add the onions and cook slowly until softened, about 10 mins.

  2. Add the garlic, stir for 1 min, then toss in the peppers, mushrooms, peas and leek. Stir in the spices, then tip in the rice (after you have drained the water from it of course) Stir to coat the rice in the oils and spices for about 2 mins, then pour in the hot stock. Bring to the boil,

    Remove your chicken from the oven and add to the rice mixture

    Stir well to coat chicken, let the whole lot stand for 5 mins then serve.

Sweet potato carbonara


Loaded with veggies, this spiralized sweet potato vegetable noodles recipe achieves superfood status with the addition of spinach. Look for large, straight sweet potatoes to make the longest veggie noodles.

I found this dish easy tomake and bursting with flavour, it is also gluten free, nut free, high in calcium and fiber, give it a go and key me know what you think.

Ready to eat in approx 40 mins.

Ingredients

  • 2 pounds sweet potatoes, peeled
  • 1 leek, sliced,
  • 3 large eggs, beaten
  • 1 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • ¼ teaspoon ground pepper
  • A few sprays of low fat cooking spray
  • 3 strips center-cut bacon, chopped
  • 2 cloves garlic,
  • 1 cup of baby spinach leav

 

 

 

 

 

Method

Put a large pot of water on to boil.

  1. You can buy the ‘swoodles’ pre spiralized but if using a spiral vegetable slicer or julienne vegetable peeler, cut sweet potatoes lengthwise into long, thin strands
  2. Cook the sweet potatoes in the boiling water, gently stirring once or twice, until just starting to soften but not completely tender, 1½ to 3 minutes. Reserve ¼ cup of the cooking water, then drain. Return the noodles to the pot, off the heat. Combine eggs, Parmesan, salt, pepper and the reserved water in a bowl; pour over the noodles and gently toss with tongs until evenly coated.
  3. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add bacon and leek and cook, stirring often, until the liquid has evaporated, 6 to 8 minutes. Add garlic and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add spinach and cook, stirring, until wilted, 1 to 2 minutes. Add the vegetables to the noodles and toss to combine. Top with a generous grinding of pepper.
  • Make Ahead Tip: Refrigerate the raw “noodles” (Step 2) for up to 1 day.
  • Equipment: Spiral vegetable slicer